Fil2 Thesis Statement

 

You need a good thesis statement for your essay but are having trouble getting started. You may have heard that your thesis needs to be specific and arguable, but still wonder what this really means.

Let’s look at some examples. Imagine you’re writing about John Hughes’s film Sixteen Candles (1984).

You take a first pass at writing a thesis:

Sixteen Candles is a romantic comedy about high school cliques.

Is this a strong thesis statement? Not yet, but it’s a good start. You’ve focused on a topic--high school cliques--which is a smart move because you’ve settled on one of many possible angles. But the claim is weak because it’s not yet arguable. Intelligent people would generally agree with this statement—so there’s no real “news” for your reader.  You want your thesis to say something surprising and debatable.   If your thesis doesn’t go beyond summarizing your source, it’s not arguable.

The key words in the thesis statement are “romantic comedy” and “high school cliques.” One way to sharpen the claim is to start asking questions.

For example, how does the film represent high school cliques in a surprising or complex way?  How does the film reinforce stereotypes about high school groups and how does it undermine them? Or why does the film challenge our expectations about romantic comedies by focusing on high school cliques? If you can answer one of those questions (or others of your own), you’ll have a strong thesis.

 

Tip : Asking “how” or “why” questions will help you refine your thesis, making it more arguable and interesting to your readers.

 

 

Take 2. You revise the thesis. Is it strong now?

Sixteen Candles is a romantic comedy criticizing the divisiveness created by high school cliques.

You’re getting closer. You’re starting to take a stance by arguing that the film identifies “divisiveness” as a problem and criticizes it, but your readers will want to know how this plays out and why it’s important. Right now, the thesis still sounds bland – not risky enough to be genuinely contentious.

 

Tip: Keep raising questions that test your ideas. And ask yourself the “so what” question. Why is your thesis interesting or important?

 

Take 3. Let’s try again. How about this version?

Although the film Sixteen Candles appears to reinforce stereotypes about high school cliques, it undermines them in important ways, questioning its viewers’ assumptions about what’s normal.

Bingo! This thesis statement is pretty strong. It challenges an obvious interpretation of the movie (that it just reinforces stereotypes), offering a new and more complex reading in its place. We also have a sense of why this argument is important. The film’s larger goal, we learn, is to question what we think we understand about normalcy.

 

What’s a Strong Thesis?

As we’ve just seen, a strong thesis statement crystallizes your paper's argument and, most importantly, argues a debatable point.

This means two things. It goes beyond merely summarizing or describing to stake out an interpretation or position that’s not obvious, and others could challenge for good reasons. It’s also arguable in the literal sense that it can be argued, or supported through a thoughtful analysis of your sources. If your argument lacks evidence, readers will think your thesis statement is an opinion or belief as opposed to an argument.

Exercises for Drafting an Arguable Thesis

A good thesis will be focused

Best Answer:  Writing a movie review is no easy task and requires not only a critical eye, but also a certain knack. Although you may not necessarily possess an inclination to this kind of work, you may very well develop the skill of doing it and deal with most assignments of this type.

Roughly speaking, a film review is a short description aimed at providing the potential viewer with the information about its strengths and weaknesses. The style of a review is reader-oriented and can be either formal or informal. The main grammar peculiarity is the preferential use of present tenses. As for the structural peculiarities, a review normally contains the following parts:


An introduction, which gives all the background information, such as the type of the film, cast and the director, main characters and the setting.
A main body, which deals with the key plot elements as well as the comments on the acting, directing and character development.
A conclusion, which is mainly the opinion of the author about whether the film is worth watching.

Consider the following examples of movie reviews in order to get familiarized with the style peculiarities:

1. Formal review introduction

Released in 1999, American Beauty shocked the audience, questioning the very basis of the American family life ideal. A powerful and provoking tragical comedy, created by Sam Mendes and a wonderful cast of Kevin Spacey (Lester Burnham), Annette Benning (Caroline Burnham), Mena Suvari (Angela Hayes) and Thora Birch (Jane Burham), exploits the usual topic of the midlife crisis, but uncovers a deep hidden conflict of the personality feeling oppressed within the limits of the “normal” life and the society, which uses a wide range of tools to make you behave in the correct way.

2. Informal review introduction

Tired of sobby melodramas and stupid comedies? Why not watch a film with a difference? American Beauty by Sam Mendes is both a drama and a comedy, which definitely absorbed the best features of the genres, creating a powerful and mind-boggling cocktail of love, hatred, sinful passion, rebellion, loneliness, fear and total liberation.
http://www.writemypapers.org/examples-an...

Source(s):

Robert Patterson · 7 years ago

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