Personal Statement Guide Examples Of Personification

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Your personal statement is an important part of your application to Oxford. It allows you to tell us about your interests, achievements and ambitions in your own words. Although we do not formally score your statement we read it carefully. If you are invited for interview, the statement is likely to provide a focus for the questions that you are asked. It is therefore essential that your statement is an accurate, unembellished account of your activities. We may check the claims that you make on your statement: discovery of fabricated or exaggerated material – during the admissions exercise, or even later on during your time as a student – may bring into question your suitability to practise Medicine. 

Present yourself in the best light: the same basic facts about yourself (in terms of education, interests, experience), when presented differently, can quite dramatically convey positive or negative messages about you to tutors.

For A100 Medicine at Oxford, GCSE and BMAT performance data are predominantly used initially to determine whether or not you are short-listed for interview. The information that you provide in your personal statement becomes increasingly important if you are not short-listed on the basis of GCSE and BMAT scores. Of course, every detail becomes important once you have reached the interviews and are being considered for a place.

1. Please do not be shy in declaring any mitigating circumstances

These may help us to put your achievements or personality within a finer context. We actively look for reasons why you may have under-performed in examinations, or performed well against the odds. These may be factors associated with your schooling, health or domestic circumstances. If you are returning to study after a break, or switching vocation, it is even more important to highlight your reasons for choosing to study Medicine, and for you to demonstrate your determination, resilience, ability and commitment. 

2. Do not simply recount everything you have ever undertaken

We’re looking for quality, not quantity! Remember that large numbers of applicants apply for our courses. Tell us in what ways you will stand out from the crowd. In choosing to talk about an activity, describe what you have drawn from the experience: has it changed you as a person? Did it surprise you?

3. We want to learn about you as a person, not just about your academic qualifications

If you have undertaken extra-curricular activities, or hold positions of responsibility at school, tell us why you sought these, and why they are important to you. You will not impress us by simply recounting that you took up a placement in Thailand, but we might be more appreciative if you tell us what you personally learnt from the experience, about your interaction with local people, and about shadowing the medical team working within your village. 

Example: I have become involved with a city music and drama group, and work especially with the younger members. I find this exciting and more than occasionally challenging. Coaching for the group has given me experience in organising others, as well as teaching them. Watching group members learn and progress is thrilling, especially in the case of one of them who has ADHD. At first he was incapable of remaining still, silent or attentive for even a few minutes, but eventually became far more focused and calmer, making excellent progress in many areas.

4. Directly address our selection criteria in your statement

Here are our selection criteria and some examples:

Personal characteristics: suitability for medicine

  • Empathy: ability and willingness to imagine the feelings of others and understand the reasons for the views of others

Example: My volunteering in the local community and my studies in Religion and Classical Civilization have also increased my ability to understand varying cultural, ethical and social perspectives, and allowed me to look at issues in a wider context.

  • Motivation: a reasonably well-informed and strong desire to practise medicine

Example: My interest in the human body burgeoned while I was taking the Essentials of First Aid class organised by St John Ambulance. The two consecutive years of volunteer service in X Hospital that followed reinforced my passion for the subject.

  • Communication: ability to make knowledge and ideas clear using language appropriate to the audience
  • Honesty and Integrity
  • Ethical awareness
  • Ability to work with others

Example: I have had a weekend job at X since 2016, which has further allowed me to develop teamwork skills, taught me how to work towards personal targets when under pressure, and allowed me to interact with many different members of the public.

Example: Dancing has taught me valuable people skills; you learn to work intimately with fellow dancers and trust them completely.

  • Capacity for sustained and intense work

Academic Potential

  • Problem-solving: critical thinking, analytical approach
  • Intellectual curiosity: keenness to understand the reason for observations; depth; tendency to look for meaning; enthusiasm and curiosity in science
  • Communication skills: willingness and ability to express clearly and effectively; ability to listen; compatibility with tutorial format

Example: Studying History at A-level has helped develop my writing and critical analysis skills.

Example: At school I have taken part in a French exchange programme which greatly improved my language skills, independence and confidence.

5. You will not be alone in trying to open your statement with an attention grabbing intro

If you try this, make sure it helps tutors to learn something about what motivates and enthuses you.

Example: My vast collection of books and videos on "How the Body Works" when I was 7 years old first triggered my interest in the functions of the body. Watching the little personified, cartoon blobs that represented red blood cells run around an animated yet functioning body fascinated me and I longed to find out more. As a result, when a friend received a letter explaining their little girl had just been diagnosed with X at just 14 months old, I was intrigued to find out what this was.

6. The statement is called a personal statement for a reason

It should be written by you, not by your parents, siblings, or teachers. Do not plagiarise material that you find on the web as there is a great chance that such deception will be discovered.

7. Do not feel that there is a precise template to follow that will score you points!

We look for bright and independent thinkers, so try to be original!

The Purpose of the Literary Tool of Personification

As it is generally known, “personification (impersonation or incarnation) is the act of attributing human qualities to an animal, object or abstraction; the act of personifying” (Personification, n.d.). The gist of personification finds its description in the fact that inanimate objects and phenomena acquire human characteristics, properties, and qualities, that is they are able to speak, feel, and think. Being a special kind of metaphor, personification is considered to be a very common stylistic device in folk poetry and literature of all nations. Fairy tales and fables of every folk are full of different kinds of impersonation. Incarnation, as the phenomenon of style, has a place in those cases where it is used as an allegory, that is, the image of the object, which converts it stylistically.

The best way to show the use of impersonation is to give an example. “If an author says the grasses in a field are dancing in the wind, for example, this is an example of personifying the plants. The grasses are clearly not dancing, they are simply moving in response to the wind currents, but saying they are dancing evokes an image of nature that is easier to picture and relate to” (Why do writers use personification, n.d).

The essence of impersonation as a special artistic phenomenon is lying in formation of an idiosyncratic concept that combines attributes of the object or animal and man. This concept reflects the special artistic and poetic “reality” created by the imagination. Personification is based on the interaction of objective and subjective perception plans of the same phenomenon. In spite of the fact that people have always been connected with nature and worship its gifts, they nevertheless understood that they depended on it. And consequently, being caught in this dependence on natural phenomena, humanity tried to subdue it mentally, poetically, and be closer to it spiritually. All folk metaphors and ways of using impersonation are based on human desire to tame the phenomenon of natural elements.

According to literary critic and folklorist Bazanov V.G. (The role of personification in Esenin’s lyric, n.d.), “if the poet turns to inanimate nature, he thereby animates it, humanizes, considering that it is able at least to understand him.”

Here is one more interesting example which shows that nature is alive according to poets’ writings: “When well-appareled April on the heel of limping winter treads” (Romeo and Juliet, 1597). In this case, Shakespeare gives to april and winter real human qualities. In his writing he expresses the idea that a month can really be in a hurry and is capable of dressing up and walking. With this phrase he conveys the general expectation of spring, when everybody is looking forward to sunshine and joy. And april, as if it is stepping on winter, making efforts to hurry it up.

Also, personification had great meaning in ancient times – when there were many cults of animals. Animals were attributed to a particular person, depending on his qualities, skills and, certainly, courage. When tribes or individuals triumphed, they had a right to require from the fallen ones to worship the winners’ totem. Egyptians treated the gods not just as spirits, but as reasonable embodiments, who are able to transform into any creature or thing. In Egyptian mythology cats were associated with a large number of deities. For instance, Bast (the cat-headed goddess) was an incarnation of protection, fertility, and motherhood. Since the time, when cats began to be identified with Bast, they simultaneously began to be mummified by people. Honors received by them posthumously reflected what they had embodied for every day of their lives. The Greek historian Herodotus (Cats in Ancient Egypt, n. d.) wrote that “the Egyptians rushed into the burning house to make sure there was no cat inside, and after the death of the cat family was in mourning and shaved off their eyebrows as a sign of grief.”

So, what is the purpose of using personification as a literary tool?

The aim of this is to attract and interest readers, making them get involved in the story. Also, this tool makes the plot vivid and flexible. Moreover, impersonation is one of the greatest ways to express mood of definite writing without direct description of it. The authors understand that it is very important not to lose readers and do everything in the direction of keeping them reading. In general, people are likely to believe in something alive and have emotional feedback from any reading. Personification helps to visualize the story and creates some space for human imagination.

Along with impersonation intellectual and emotional sides of the personality are equally and intensively refined. Incarnation helps a person not only to understand the content but also feel the life of the surrounding world, because it is considered to be one of the manifestations of the capacity for empathy. Through an understanding of impersonation, the human ability to empathize and feel is in the process of restoring. Writers comprehend that it is difficult to keep this ability throughout life, and with help of their works they try to remind people that all we live in the world which is full of imagination and living beings we should value and take care of.

References

Cats in Ancient Egypt. Retrieved from ru.wikipedia.org/
Personification. Retrieved from dictionary.reference.com/
Romeo and Juliet, 1597. Retrieved from literarydevices.net/personification
The role of personification in Esenin’s lyric. Retrieved from choolknigdom21.blogpost.com
Why do writers use personification. Retrieved from www.wisegeek.com/personification

Literature is a form of art. However, this doesn’t mean that there are no rules and laws in this discipline. There are a lot of literary tools that you should know if you are going to write a work of fiction. Also, you should be knowledgeable in literary theoretical framework when studying literature. We would like to get you acquainted with our sample literary analysis essay, so you can see how difficult it can be to identify literary tools in text.

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